1. Home
  2. Blog
  3. Fishing

Fishing

There are currently 53 blog entries related to this category.

The game offshore this weekend goes to sailfish, snappers, and gaffers. Sailfish are strong just in time for the Dust ‘Em Off Tournament, with releases in the double digits off of Palm Beach. Kite fishing with live goggle-eyes or blue runners in 100-300’ should entice a few sails. While dolphin schoolies are abundant, a few gaffers have been chasing ballyhoo and bonita strips in the 150-600’ range. Trolling with small feathers during lowlight should help you catch a few football-sized blackfin tuna, and the smaller ones can be used to catch wahoo. If you're thinking of heading to the Bahamas for the first time, read "How to Cross From Florida to the Bahamas By Boat".

Large mutton snapper have been pretty hot lately, with plenty of yellowtail action on

450 Views, 0 Comments.

Sailfish are biting from Stuart to Boca in the 150-300’ range, with a few boats releasing 10+ sails. Try kite fishing with hearty live baits like goggle-eyes or blue runners. Trolling with small feathers during lowlight should help you catch a few football-sized blackfin tuna, and the smaller ones can be used to catch wahoo, which has been hot due to this mild cold front, especially in the Bahamas. If you're thinking of heading to the Bahamas for the first time, read "How to Cross From Florida to the Bahamas By Boat".

Fair numbers of snapper have been prevalent around 100’ off of Jupiter, with a few cobia here and there as well.

The cold front has slowed snook down a bit, but mullet are still running. Live mullet or top water plugs at low-lighted

581 Views, 0 Comments.

The bite was scarce last weekend, but it seems to have been picking up this week due to the full moon. A few wahoo are starting to show up from the full moon and mild cold front, especially closer to the Bahamas. Around here, 150-400’ is where wahoo have hooked up along with blackfin tuna. Troll with small feathers during lowlight for tuna, and use the small ones to catch wahoo. Another option is to pick up a local favorite Junkanoo Lure and high speed troll in a zig-zag pattern. Sailfish are also coming out of the woodwork, and kite fishing with hearty live baits like goggle-eyes or blue runners is your best bet.

Kingfish and large mutton snapper have been eating sardines near 120 – 200’, and yellowtail snapper has been showing up in strong

657 Views, 0 Comments.

 

Photo Credit: @SouthFlorida_Sailfishing

A few sailfish have been chasing flying fish relatively early in the season. Saturday or Sunday’s forecast of north winds may contribute to the bite a little, and a good bet at getting them to eat would be kite fishing with a hearty bait like goggle-eyes or blue runners in 200-400’ of water. Small dolphin have been pretty consistent offshore, as well as football-sized blackfin tuna. Target both by trolling with small-skirted bonita strips at depths of 120-500’.

Kingfish and large mutton snapper have been eating sardines near 120 – 200’, and yellowtail snapper has been showing up in strong numbers.

Inshore, the mullet run is still hot, and snook, jacks, tarpon, ladyfish, and redfish aren’t far behind

799 Views, 0 Comments.

The 65th Stuart Sailfish Club Light Tackle Tournament will be held December 5th-8th to benefit the club’s scholarship fund. Every year, the Club provides scholarships to five Martin County students furthering their education in the fields of Marine Science, Marine Biology, or Marine Conservation.

The tournament includes two divisions; Light Tackle and the Treasure Coast Championship. The event includes a kick-off party and nightly festivities. All registered participants are provided a daily breakfast, a lunch to go, and a BBQ on the dock each night, followed by the awards banquet dinner on Saturday, December 8th.

Receive 10% off by registering before November 23rd online.

383 Views, 0 Comments.

 

Stone Crab Season began in Florida state waters yesterday, and while this sweet succulent meat is allowed to be harvested until May, there are a few things you need to know.

Minimum Size Limit

Stone crab claws must measure at least 2 ¾ inches in length. Learn how to measure them properly HERE.

Daily Bag Limit

Individuals are allowed to harvest 1 gallon of claws per person or 2 gallons of claws per vessel, whichever is less.

How to Harvest

The claws are the only part to be taken from a stone crab, as they grow back when separated from the body properly. The law permits both claws to be harvested if they are of legal size, but it is courtesy to only harvest one claw per crab. This practice leaves the crab with a method of defense, and

553 Views, 0 Comments.

 

Stone crabs are a delicacy in South Florida, and federal wildlife protection agencies like FWC would like to keep them abundant. In order to do that, they’ve made a minimum size for these delicious crustacean limbs. Here’s how to measure stone crab claws.

Stone crab claws must measure at least 2 ¾-inches in length measured by a straight line from the elbow to the tip of the lower immovable finger. This is the largest section of the claw that has both a movable and immovable finger, and is located farthest from the body of the crab.

For more information, visit http://myfwc.com/fishing/saltwater/commercial/stone-crab/

389 Views, 0 Comments.

Pictured: Shannon Discount & Capt. Michael O'Conner of Boatsitters

Offshore, football-sized blackfin tuna have been pretty easy to get ahold of in about 200-400’ of water. You can use small daisy chains or troll with feathers, but quite a few have been caught trolling with small-skirted bonita strips as well. We had a lot of success with neon green and white skirts this week, but colors are a game that changes by the minute, so try a few different ones and switch the rest out as you go if your target fish is tending to a particular color. Dolphin have been in the same areas as blackfin, and wahoo have been non-existent. On the first cold front that rolls through, we’ll have our local favorite Junkanoo Lures ready. Regardless of our lack of cold

1,036 Views, 0 Comments.

If you’re planning to bring your furry friend with you when cruising to the Bahamas, you’ll need a permit. You can request an application by the way of snail mail below, but most people choose the expedited process by calling 242-325-7502/9 or faxing 242-325-3960. A fee of $10 is required with your application, which can be downloaded HERE.

Your pet must be older than 6 months of age, have required vaccinations, and have a certificate of health from your veterinarian.

For more information about crossing to the Bahamas from Florida, GO HERE.

 

Director of Agriculture, Department of Agriculture

Levy Building, East Bay Street

P.O. BOX N-3704

Nassau, Bahamas

837 Views, 0 Comments.

  Below are the official Bahamian Ports of Entry. Learn more about checking in and other tips on how to crossing from Florida to the Bahamas by boat HERE.  
  • THE ABACOS: Green Turtle Cay, Marsh Harbour, Spanish Cay, Treasure Cay or Walker’s Cay
  • THE BERRYS: Chub or Great Harbour Cays
  • NORTH BIMINI: Alice Town
  • CAT CAY: at Hawk’s Nest Marina
  • ANDROS: Congo Town, Fresh Creek, Mangrove Cay or Morgan’s Bluff
  • NASSAU, NEW PROVIDENCE: any marina
  • GRAND BAHAMA: Freeport Harbour, Lucayan Marina Village and Port Lucaya; Old Bahama Bay at West End
  • ELEUTHERA: Governor’s Harbour, Harbour Island, Rock Sound or Spanish Wells
  • THE EXUMAS: George Town, Exuma
  • LONG ISLAND: Stella Maris Airport
  • SAN SALVADOR: Cockburn Town
  • MAYAGUANA:
811 Views, 0 Comments.